Long time ago, we post MCSE 70-290 notes on managing groups. Today, My friends experiencing this MCSE Server 2003 exam have organized his notes on shared Folder and NTFS permissions to help the candidates to MCSA/MCSE have a better understand of the syllabus or exam notes. Although there are full of 70-290 braindumps or eBooks or pdf or other study guide, the experience or notes can be more useful for our 70-290 preparation. Of course, if you have better materials or advice to share with the MCSE candidates, please let me know.

 


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SO, get down to business.Let’s see the TechNet’s.

Shared folders and file system (NTFS) permissions have appeared on Microsoft exams since the first MCP certifications. Even though some major changes and additions have been made, overall the basics remained the same. What also remained the same is that it can still be a very confusing topic. Although this TechNotes is fairly complete for the 70-290 exam, make sure you practice these topics on a real Windows 2003 server.

Shared folders and file system (NTFS) permissions have appeared on Microsoft exams since the first IT certification. Even though some major changes and additions have been made, overall the basics remained the same. What also remained the same is that it can still be a very confusing topic. Although this TechNotes is fairly complete for the 70-290 Exam, make sure you practice these topics on a real Windows 2003 server.

There are two main types of access permissions in Windows 2003: NTFS file and folder permissions, and shared folder permissions. First we will go over the theory and practical aspect of both and then we’ll see how they work combined.

NTFS Permissions
Before NTFS became the default file system on all Windows operating systems, one of the main considerations to use NTFS, instead of FAT or FAT32, was the possibility to assign permissions for individual files and folders. Each file and folder on an NTFS volume contains an Access Control List (ACL). This list contains entries for groups and individual user accounts mapped to their corresponding permissions. When a user tries to access a resource, Windows checks the ACL if the user is listed and what level of permission is assigned. It doesn’t matter whether the user tries to access the resources on the hard drive or on a remote server.